Carcinoma of the Uterine Endometrium

Carcinoma of the uterine endometrium is the most common pelvic malignancy in women. U.S. and Canada has the highest incidence rates worldwide, while developing countries and Japan have incidence rates 4-5 times lower. Epidemiological data indicate that there are two forms of endometrial cancer. The first form is directly related to estrogen exposure and is most common in the U.S.


The other forms are not related to estrogen and occurs worldwide. Type I tumors associated with estrogen occur in perimenopausal women who are younger and have a good prognosis. In fact, type I lesions can potentially diecgah through the introduction of risk to patients, the diagnosis of precursor lesions (atypical endometrial hyperplasia), and appropriate treatment. Type II tumors that are not associated with estrogen occurs in older postmenopausal women without a history of estrogen exposure and has a poor prognosis lehih. Molecular genetic changes found in endometrial carcinoma type I and type II differ and may help in explaining the clinical characteristics.